Flower Power

Flowers are part of the arsenal of cosmetics, because flowers are part of the infrastructure of nature. As one of the earth’s most bountiful expressions of symmetry, color and flowing grace, the flower will obviously play a part in the wardrobe of any fashion aficionado. The question is how and when to use it.
Famed designer Oscar de la Renta is among the most notable fashion professionals to make widespread use of the floral motif in his work. A great deal of his inspiration is captured in the book The Style, Inspiration, and Life of Oscar de la Renta, published in 2014 by Assouline. This is a must read for anyone who is looking for a unique way to incorporate flower power into a fashion sense.
Led by examples like de la Renta, flowers have become one of the most ever present motifs in all of fashion. You are likely to have at least one floral piece of clothing hanging in the closet. Again – the question is if you are using it correctly! One of the latest high fashion forays into flowers was manifested through the Tory Burch Fall/Winter 2018 Collection. Launched during New York Fashion Week, the Burch show included 14,000 pink carnations, Pina Bausch and “flower flash” video to drive the point home.
We have many examples today of how to mix floral patterns with other designs, but this was not always the case. It is always good to understand a history of how a particular motif came to be included in more mainstream fashion – knowing how it was used (and the mistakes that were made with it in the past) will help you make the right decisions about the how to use the motif today.
In fashion generations before, flowers actually held a much deeper meaning beyond their surface level aesthetic. The origin of their use in fabrics rests in Asia, where flowers are a vital part of culture as well as fashion to this day.
In Japan, the chrysanthemum was used in kimonos because of its slender, long petals. The flower radiated in the same way as the sun, and these ancient cultures began to associate the flower with the sun accordingly. It became a royal symbol as well, and eventually found its way into a number of surface design techniques.
The Chinese also made use of flowers, weaving them into detailed, colorful embroideries and textiles. The lotus flower was made famous in this way, and began to represent purity to the culture. The Ottoman culture took a great deal of inspiration from the Chinese, especially in their woven velvets. In this way, the fashion spread to other parts of the world.
Ancient cultures in India also used flowers heavily in floral designs, which they then traded to Europeans. Chintz, a bucolic print, was used in the 17th century for many aspects of early American and European fashion.
I give you all of this history to say this – flowers are among the most versatile weapons you have in your fashion arsenal. They can be used to make an arrangement more ornate or feminize a masculine outfit, depending on how they are used. As an example, wearing a floral with a denim or corduroy item gives you that perfect mix of feminine and tough that turns heads – especially if you judiciously throw some leather or suede into the mix!
Flowers are naturally geometric as well. If you are looking to add symmetry to your design that does not come across as overly robotic, a floral cosmetic or motif may be just the thing that you are looking for.
Here are some ideas on how to wear the flower prints. Enjoy and take in some flower power that you can use!
Texte en Français
Les fleurs font partie de l’arsenal de l’industrie des cosmétiques et de la mode. En tant que l’une des expressions les plus évidentes de symétrie, de couleur et de grâce, la fleur joue évidemment un rôle important dans la garde-robe de tout amateur de mode. La question est de savoir comment et quand l’utiliser.
Le célèbre designer Oscar de la Renta est l’un des professionnels de la mode les plus remarquables à avoir utilisé le motif floral dans ses créations. Une grande partie de son inspiration est capturée dans le livre The Style, Inspiration and Life of Oscar de la Renta, publié en 2014 par Assouline. C’est un must pour tous ceux qui cherchent un moyen unique d’incorporer la puissance des fleurs dans leurs tenues.
Inspirés par l’approche de la Renta, plusieurs autres ont eu recours aux pouvoirs des fleurs et elles sont devenues l’un des motifs les plus présents dans la mode. Vous êtes susceptible d’avoir au moins un vêtement avec un imprimé floral suspendu dans votre placard. Encore une fois, la question est de savoir si vous l’utilisez correctement! L’une des dernières incursions des fleurs dans la haute couture s’est manifestée à travers la collection Automne / Hiver 2018 de Tory Burch. Lancée pendant la semaine de la mode de New York, le défilé comprenait 14 000 œillets roses et Pina Bausch ainsi qu’une vidéo présentant des images de fleurs.
Nous avons beaucoup d’exemples aujourd’hui sur la façon d’agencer les motifs floraux avec d’autres imprimés, mais cela n’a pas toujours été le cas. Il est toujours bon de comprendre l’histoire et l’origine de l’emploi d’un motif afin de savoir comment il a été utilisé (et ainsi éviter les erreurs qui ont été faites par le passé) et nous aider à bien l’incorporer dans nos ensembles.
Jadis, l’utilisation des fleurs avait en réalité une signification beaucoup plus profonde qui allait au-delà de leur beauté. L’origine de leur application dans les tissus réside en Asie, où les fleurs sont une partie vitale de la culture et de la mode encore à ce jour.
Au Japon, le chrysanthème était utilisé dans la confection des kimonos à cause de ses longs pétales minces. La fleur irradiait de la même manière que le soleil, et ces cultures anciennes ont tout naturellement commencé à associer la fleur au soleil. Le chrysanthème est aussi devenu un symbole royal et a finalement fait son chemin dans un certain nombre de conceptions artistiques, dont la mode.
Les Chinois ont également utilisé les fleurs, les tissant dans des broderies et des textiles détaillés et colorés. La fleur de lotus a été rendue célèbre de cette manière, et a commencé à représenter la pureté à la culture. La culture ottomane s’est beaucoup inspirée des Chinois, surtout pour leurs velours tissés. De cette façon, cette tendance s’est graduellement étendue à d’autres parties du monde.
Les cultures anciennes en Inde utilisaient aussi beaucoup les fleurs dans leurs imprimés, qu’elles ont échangés ensuite avec les Européens. Le chintz, un imprimé bucolique, était déjà utilisé au 17ème siècle pour la confection de vêtements par les Américains et les Européens.
Je vous ai présenté ce bref historique pour finalement vous dire que les imprimés fleuris sont parmi les armes les plus polyvalentes que vous avez dans votre arsenal vestimentaire. Les fleurs peuvent être utilisées pour agrémenter un look ou féminiser une tenue masculine, selon la façon dont elles sont agencées. Par exemple, si vous portez une pièce florale avec du denim ou du velours côtelé cela vous donnera une allure à la fois féminine et Edgy qui fera assurément tourner les têtes – surtout si vous ajoutez judicieusement du cuir ou du daim dans le mélange!
Enfin, n’oubliez pas que les fleurs sont naturellement géométriques. Si vous cherchez à donner de la symétrie à votre tenue mais ne voulez pas ressembler à un robot, un imprimé fleuri ou un motif floral peut être juste la chose dont vous avez besoin.
Voir les photos ci-dessus pour des idées sur la façon de porter les imprimés fleuris. Inspirez-vous du pouvoir des fleurs et de leur beauté!
Stay strong, stay stylish! – Soyez forte, soyez stylée!
Let’s stay connected: Bloglovin – Instagram @3cstyle_fashion

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58 Comments

  1. Dominique, an interesting post and I loved the historical element to florals! 😀 off to check out my wardrobe and see what flowers inhabit there … thanks for the tip of how to wear them well. I do have a couple of floral tops and like wearing jeans with them … glad to know I’m on the right track! 😀

    Liked by 2 people

    1. You are definitely on the right track. Can’t go wrong : Denim + floral print = super lovely and comfy for a classy and creative lady! BTW I have received your book from Amazon but I have not yet read it. It is next on my To-Read list! 💛

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Oh, you have me smiling at your classy and creative lady!! I can but try! It’s quite funny as a youngster and even in my 20s I had no time for fashion or clothes, my head always in a book, studying, working! Then I looked up and noticed clothes…wow! Love it now! So happy my book is in your hands and excited you’ll be reading it soon. Enjoy! ❤️🌺

      Liked by 1 person

    3. In my youth I was either in a book or playing hockey with my big brother and his friends. I was a real tomboy! Never played with the Barbies that were given to me. But around the age of 10 I started to make clothing for them with any fabrics I could put my hands on and this is how my passion for creating beautiful looks started. Can’t wait to snuggle in my bathrobe and start reading your book! 💞💐 💞

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Quel bel article! En fait, si je ne peux m’offrir le bonheur de porter du fleuri, au risque d’avoir l’air d’un buisson géant, je peux me détendre en lisant ton article et admirer les photos. Je trouve que ces imprimés respirent la vie, le mouvement. On ne peut rester indifférent à une tenue fleurie; il s’y dégage une impression, réussie ou pas, c’est selon. Comme tu le soulignes c’est un art à maîtriser. Gros bisous et prends soin de toi Dominique. Si tu as du temps j’aurais quelques bons romans d’auteurs québécois à te proposer. Dans de très belles maisons d’éditions d’ici 😊. 😍

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Merci pour ton superbe message Imelda. tellement gentil. 💛 Et ouiiiiii, ça m’intéresse d’avoir des suggestions d’auteurs québécois! Tu as mon courriel?dominique.nancy@3cstyle.com

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    1. Sorry to hear about your back. Hope you will get better soon. I have not forgotten about our project Alison. I will work on that before you become a grandmother! 😀

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    1. Ah This is such a beautiful comment. Thanks Darren. You know what? I would love to use one day one of your drawings to embellished a purse or create fabric for clothing. Your Corsican Hellebore, Geissorhiza or February Flowers drawings for example would look fabulous on a kimono-like dress! 🌸

      Liked by 2 people

    1. It is the same in Quebec. Still lots of snow but at least it is bright and sunny! 😎 Can’t wear the embellished shoes yet but I’m enjoying my flower shape earrings until spring arrives. 🌸

      Liked by 2 people

    1. It is not the trend I will mainly be focussing on this summer (I’m crushing on feathers and ruffles right now), but flower prints are definitely part of the essential items in my wardrobe. Love to mix feminine floral clothes with masculine pieces. I guess I have a split personality! Thanks so much Cathi for reading me. 😄

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  3. Allo Dominique!
    Je t’ai ecris qq chose sur ton courriel 3cstyle.com mais ça m’est revenu comme “non envoyé ” , mais je te l’ai aussi envoyé à UdeM si tu veux aller voir ma proposition 😉
    À +

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Love this post, Dominique! Flowers are so beautiful, in real life, in paintings or on textiles. I´ve always had a soft spot for asian designs, especially kimonos and the chrysanthemums are just so beautiful especially for this purpose. Thank you so much for sharing not only so many interesting historic facts about floral motifs but also some very lovely fashion tips! xoxo

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello Sarah. I have a long time passion for asian designs and such a big crush right now on kimonos with floral patterns. I like searching for historic facts as it helps us make better decisions. I am all about knowledge. Thank you so much for your kind words my friend. I will reply to your other message today. I have been very busy with a big project you will soon hear about. Have a lovely day. xoxo

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank youuuuuu Martina. I need flowers in my life too. On my clothing and fresh ones in my house every week… My florist loves me as I am one of her regular clients! 😄 I had a wonderful Sunday. Hope you did as well. Darren, Lisa, Roda and I just launched a big project. You’ll see more flowers and critters too. It’s on the blog whenever you have time. Have a fabulous week dear friend. xoxo

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    1. You will see a lot more flowers on the blog soon! A big project relate to Nature and Fashion will be launch this coming wednesday. 🌸 A post about this project is already published my blog. Thanks for stopping by Sharon. Have a great week. xoxo

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Comme toujours, tes articles sont bien écrits, complets, intelligents et relatent de manière divertissante l’histoire de la mode ! Merci pour ta sélection de photos, qui sont aussi des sources d’inspiration ! J’ai de même consacré un article à une jupe florale et aux motifs qu’elle m’évoquait, entre peinture et photographie… si ça te parle : https://lenversdescorps.wordpress.com/2016/08/16/soieries-florales/ 😉😘

    Liked by 2 people

  6. I have beautiful big gardens that I work in all summer alongside my pigs and chickens and cows but I have always shied away from wearing florals. They always remind me of the pajamas my Mum used to make when we were kids. I adore floral curtains and gorgeous big blousy florals on couches and comfy chairs but again I am too afraid all my furniture are bright block colours! Hmmm. You have made me think about this – maybe i do need to find some courage and introduce some flowers into my wardrobe and not just into my landscape. Thank you. Have a gorgeous day. (I am also going to press FOLLOW – I am intrigued. ). Cecilia

    Liked by 1 person

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